We discovered Guineafowl a couple of years ago thanks to an artisanal producer at the hippie market. These are completely free-range birds that are only grown seasonally and brought to market before the cold weather hits. We buy them in the late Fall and stock up the freezer with 8-10 of the winged wonders.

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Guineafowl are primarily insectivores, thriving on worms, ants, spiders, and ticks. They do not do well fed grain (unlike chickens). Guineafowl are all dark meat that tastes incredibly rich, and the carcass makes the most amazing deep, rich, stock.

The standard cooking direction is to roast them slow and low, 3-4 hours at 250F. This because they are very lean and muscular from not sitting in cages 24/7. But I discovered a better way (of course). I brine them in a mixture of salt and sugar for 12-18 hrs, and them put them on the rotisserie for an hour. Terrific; tender meat and crispy skin.

This is yesterday’s card-night iteration, courtesy of Mr. Italo.

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Served with Greek-style lemon potatoes. Preceded by my Salmon Tartar (essentially my friend Stephane Gabart’s recipe, with a few Steve tweaks like capers and dill), and Ungava gin martinis.

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